British Council Research Links international workshop on: LOCALISING STRATEGIES FOR MAKING CITIES RESILIENT TO DISASTERS

Under the British Council’s Researcher Links scheme offered within the Newton Fund, we will be holding an international workshop on Localising Strategies for Making Cities Resilient to Disasters. The workshop will be held in Manila, Philippines from 22nd to 26th January 2018.

The workshop is being coordinated by Professor Dilanthi Amaratunga (Global Disaster Resilience Centre, University of Huddersfield, UK) and Professor Andres Winston Oreta (De La Sallle University, Manila, Philippines) and will have contributions from other leading researchers, including Professor Richard Haigh (University of Huddersfield, UK), Professor Renan Tanhueco and Professor Jose Edgar Mutuc (De La Sallle University, Manila, Philippines), and Abhilash Panda (UNISDR Making Cities Resilient).

We are now inviting Early Career Researchers from the UK or the Philippines to apply to attend this workshop. All travel and accommodation expenses will be covered by the Newton-Agham Researcher Links Programme, funded by the British Council (UK) and the Department of Science and Technology (Philippines).

 

 

Researcher links workshops

Researcher Links Workshops bring together Early Career Researchers from the UK and partner countries to make international connections that can improve the quality of their research.

These grants are funded under the Newton Fund, a UK Government initiative funded by the Department of Business, Innovation and Skills, together with partner funders from Newton Fund countries. The Fund aims to promote the economic development and welfare of either the partner countries or, through working with the partner country, to address the problems of low-income and vulnerable populations.

About the workshop

The World Risk Report (2015) identifies the Philippines as the country with the third highest disaster risk in the world. It has one of the fastest-growing populations in Asia and there will be a 70% increase over the next 40 years. In recent years, the Philippines experienced the most natural disasters in the region and suffered through 21 disasters in 2011, the third-most natural disasters worldwide. Metro Manila alone is one of the largest urban areas in East Asia, being home to 16.5 million people. Half of cities in the Philippines are situated in flood plains. Cities consist of a number of inter-dependent physical systems and human communities which are vulnerable to disasters in varying degrees. As a result of rapid urbanisation, cities are becoming extremely vulnerable to threats posed by natural hazards (Malalgoda et al., 2013). City leaders need to make significant transformative changes and investments in the resilience of their cities. In 2015, the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction (SFDRR 2015-2030) was adopted by the UN with the goal of reducing disaster risk and losses in lives, livelihoods and health. In contributing to this goal, UNISDR developed the “Ten Essentials for Making Cities Resilient” (10E) framework to enable cities to assess their resilience in accordance with the goals of SFDRR, and in recognition of a need to strengthen local governments’ role.

This "Ten Essentials for Making Cities Resilient" serves as a guide to good DRR practices and focuses on the ability of a city to plan for, mitigate, respond, recover, adapt and grow after major disasters in the light of its unique physical, economic, environmental and social circumstances. The planned workshop aims to foster multi-disciplinary discussions on the "Ten Essentials for Making Cities Resilient". It will build capacity for the development of disaster resilient cities that are better able to tackle the threat posed by hazards, create a network of partnerships, and build information that will promote livable, safe and economically vibrant cities.

The topic to be addressed in the workshop is the “New Ten Essentials in making cities resilient to disasters (10E)". The 10 essentials (http://www.unisdr.org/campaign/resilientcities/) include:

  1. Organise for disaster resilience (DR);
  2. Identify and understand risk scenarios;
  3. Strengthen financial capacity;
  4. Pursue resilient urban development;
  5. Safeguard natural buffers;
  6. Strengthen institutional capacity;
  7. Understand and strengthen societal capacity;
  8. Increase infrastructure resilience;
  9. Ensure preparedness and response; and
  10. Expedite recovery and build back better.

Communities in the Phillipines need support by way of mainstreaming "Ten Essentials for Making Cities Resilient" within their practices and to build up relevant capacity. To realize this objective, what makes a city resilient to disasters needs to be seen as a combination of resilience on one hand, and the result of actions to reduce disaster risk, the basis of "Ten Essentials for Making Cities Resilient" on the other. Academia has to build networks, including local government units, to promote dialogue and cooperation in enhancing the resilience of communities in cities.

This workshop aims to gather the academia and local stakeholders to identify strategies that can be used to assess and build a city’s resilience to disasters, using the “10 Essentials” as a guide. These strategies when implemented will give a holistic understanding of a city’s status including their interrelationships, and will guide decision makers in identifying policies and interventions that would improve the city’s resilience, thereby generating solutions that touch multiple aspects of the city and its various communities (e.g., schools, hospitals, business, government units). The participants will identify strategies, future research projects and policies that will be implemented to further compliment the UNISDR "Ten Essentials for Making Cities Resilient".

Specifically, the workshop aims to:

  1. Improve understanding and mitigate the human and economic impacts of natural hazards towards urban cities by investigating the "Ten Essentials for Making Cities Resilient" in detail to further understand the differences, overlaps and potential synergies, and thereby to develop much needed capacities in the field.
  2. Map current research and future potential around the "Ten Essentials for Making Cities Resilient" in making contributions in meeting the targets of the SFDRR 2015-2030.
  3. Help validate and further refine the "Ten Essentials for Making Cities Resilient" based on scientific dialogue.

It will also help the cities to better understand the "Ten Essentials for Making Cities Resilient" to reduce disaster risks, and the potential for integration, as well promote the role of "Ten Essentials for Making Cities Resilient" in policies and strategies. Through sharing best practices and experiences, and the development of a roadmap, the workshop will stimulate links between the UK and Philippines in this really important area of managing disaster risks. It will help ECRs grasp the complexity, work collaboratively, and engage with stakeholders to further understand the "Ten Essentials for Making Cities Resilient". It will embed researchers in a multidisciplinary and inter-sectoral programme, with input from the key experts in the fields of DRR, and global advocates of the "Ten Essentials for Making Cities Resilient".

Features of the workshop include: 

  • Held in association with the UNISDR Making Cities Resilient Campaign
  • Keynote presentations by leading scientists on the state of the art
  • Early career researcher presentations on current and emerging research
  • A collection of abstracts published as the workshop proceedings
  • Group work and activities aimed at sharing knowledge, promoting international and multi-disciplinary working
  • Development of outline action plans for immediate (within one year), short-term (one to three years) and long-term (three to five years) research work helping to validate and further refine the 10E based on scientific dialogue.
  • A research road map based on the working group discussions, inter-disciplinary work required and major challenges and opportunities around the 10E in making contributions in meeting the targets of the SFDRR 2015-2030.
  • All materials delivered during the workshop will be made available as open education resources so that they are released under an open license (creative commons) that permits no-cost access, use, adaptation and redistribution by others. This will ensure that a much wider constituency of early career researchers from Philippines and the UK, as well as interested parties from other backgrounds and countries, can benefit from the materials presented.
  • Online post-doctoral sessions that will be organised after 6 months and one year after completing the workshop on the developments of 10E
  • Authors of selected abstracts presented in the workshop will be invited to submit a full paper for publication in a Special Issue of the International Journal of Disaster Resilience in the Built Environment. The journal is indexed and abstracted in: Scopus; British Library; Construction and Building Abstracts; ICONDA - The International Construction Database; Business Source Premier (EBSCO); ABI INFORM Global (ProQuest); Cambridge Scientific Abstracts (ProQuest); and INSPEC.

The workshop is being coordinated by Professor Dilanthi Amaratunga (Global Disaster Resilience Centre, University of Huddersfield, UK) and Professor Andres Winston Oreta (De La Sallle University, Manila, Philippines ) and will have contributions from other leading researchers, including Professor Richard Haigh (University of Huddersfield, UK), Professor Renan Tanhueco and Professor Jose Edgar Mutuc (De La Sallle University, Manila, Philippines) and German Velasquez (Green Climate Fund, South Korea).

 

Website: http://buildresilience.org/nrl-philippines/